Embracing Timing within the Journey!

 Early on in my mental development of this project, it included a lot of features:   ~More than one podcast.   ~Several online courses.   ~At least one self-published novel in a series of three.  ~Services for authors to help them with researching their books.  That was the short list, the mental picture that I had at the start was huge.  I was alive with ideas, and I did not wish for the business of writing and creating a podcast to stop those ideas—so I just molded them into one big scheme~~ “branding.”   Quickly, I figured out what I had always known about myself. I am great with creating goals and deadlines. However, I am even better focusing on just one obligation at a time. I can multi-task. Being a mother, full-time employee, and student taught me well how to multi-task. My current day job is all about multi-tasking for eight hours straight. I was not worried about my abilities.   What I worried about was zapping out my creativity by all the angles of a vast endeavor.  The timing came into play about three months into the development. I had just returned from a much-needed vacation with my husband. It was our first real vacation in over five years. I was relaxed and ready to roll. When I started back on the project work, or what our family lovely calls my “side hustle,” I quickly became overwhelmed.   I had created myself real deadlines. The major deadline was fastly approaching—the launch of this blog, the website, and the podcast.   Where timing came into play in this journey was during one of my interviews for the podcast. I was listening to one of the authors describe her multi-tiered creativity. Somewhere in that distribution, she explained how she needed to step back from one aspect of her projects to see it better.  It dawned on me that I had an unrealistic timeline for my “side hustle.” I had written a detailed five-year vision statement, but I was attempting to produce the outcome of that five-year plan in only three or four months.  Timing is everything. My interview with that particular author freed me to step back for a few moments and review the overall scope of my work in the first six months. More importantly, I allowed myself to open up and see what I needed to achieve in the short timeframe.  I rethought my goals to ensure I enjoyed the activities within the. All to ensure I did not burn out. It was my journey, I set the deadlines, and I was accountable for the outcomes. I let go of the stress I placed on myself to produce the entire, massive, vision in a year and became okay with the five-year plan.    I was comfortable with the timing of the journey, and no longer stressed.  I am learning to embrace the quote by Sheryl Sandberg, “Done is better than perfect!”  How about you, what experience was timely for you on this journey?

Early on in my mental development of this project, it included a lot of features:

 ~More than one podcast.

 ~Several online courses.

 ~At least one self-published novel in a series of three.

~Services for authors to help them with researching their books.

That was the short list, the mental picture that I had at the start was huge.

I was alive with ideas, and I did not wish for the business of writing and creating a podcast to stop those ideas—so I just molded them into one big scheme~~ “branding.” 

Quickly, I figured out what I had always known about myself. I am great with creating goals and deadlines. However, I am even better focusing on just one obligation at a time. I can multi-task. Being a mother, full-time employee, and student taught me well how to multi-task. My current day job is all about multi-tasking for eight hours straight. I was not worried about my abilities. 

What I worried about was zapping out my creativity by all the angles of a vast endeavor.

The timing came into play about three months into the development. I had just returned from a much-needed vacation with my husband. It was our first real vacation in over five years. I was relaxed and ready to roll. When I started back on the project work, or what our family lovely calls my “side hustle,” I quickly became overwhelmed. 

I had created myself real deadlines. The major deadline was fastly approaching—the launch of this blog, the website, and the podcast. 

Where timing came into play in this journey was during one of my interviews for the podcast. I was listening to one of the authors describe her multi-tiered creativity. Somewhere in that distribution, she explained how she needed to step back from one aspect of her projects to see it better.

It dawned on me that I had an unrealistic timeline for my “side hustle.” I had written a detailed five-year vision statement, but I was attempting to produce the outcome of that five-year plan in only three or four months.

Timing is everything. My interview with that particular author freed me to step back for a few moments and review the overall scope of my work in the first six months. More importantly, I allowed myself to open up and see what I needed to achieve in the short timeframe.

I rethought my goals to ensure I enjoyed the activities within the. All to ensure I did not burn out. It was my journey, I set the deadlines, and I was accountable for the outcomes. I let go of the stress I placed on myself to produce the entire, massive, vision in a year and became okay with the five-year plan.  

I was comfortable with the timing of the journey, and no longer stressed.

I am learning to embrace the quote by Sheryl Sandberg, “Done is better than perfect!”

How about you, what experience was timely for you on this journey?