Enjoying the Journey with Inquiry!

 I am an investigative individual by nature. I love inquiry. I believe that was why I gravitated towards Library Services as my educational background. Researching, investigation, fact-finding, and information literacy excites me.   Starting the process of developing and producing this podcast has expanded my inquiring skills. It has grown the need for me to improve in all of my abilities.   I love when I am in the middle of researching a new author that I will be interviewing. That process of inquiring sets the questions that I ask in the podcast. Every single author I talk with, I have spent time researching their journey. I then ask the questions that I could not find the answers to on their social media sites.   I also believe that is why I gravitate towards writing historical fiction. I adore well researched historical novels. I can tell the difference between a well-researched novel or a story that only was inspired by research on Google or Wikipedia. I have been known to do some inquiry myself on the settings and characters I read—just to see how close to accurate the novels may be. It’s a sickness. I have lost interest in a story if the work doesn’t match the history.  Because I emphasize fabulous inquiry skill (research) for a novel, I am a bit slow in my writing of stories. The dialog does not bother me to write, plot and twists work out fine, usually. But I get lost in the weeds when I start to research.   Not because I do not know how to research thoroughly. Precisely the opposite. I not only find information to use for my current work. I often see many different possibilities for new stories and characters—I just cannot keep up. There are so many amazing stories to be told.   Staying inquisitive and using that creative part of ourselves allows us to be better writers---especially when done well!  How about you, do you access your inquisitive mind when you are writing journey?   

I am an investigative individual by nature. I love inquiry. I believe that was why I gravitated towards Library Services as my educational background. Researching, investigation, fact-finding, and information literacy excites me. 

Starting the process of developing and producing this podcast has expanded my inquiring skills. It has grown the need for me to improve in all of my abilities. 

I love when I am in the middle of researching a new author that I will be interviewing. That process of inquiring sets the questions that I ask in the podcast. Every single author I talk with, I have spent time researching their journey. I then ask the questions that I could not find the answers to on their social media sites. 

I also believe that is why I gravitate towards writing historical fiction. I adore well researched historical novels. I can tell the difference between a well-researched novel or a story that only was inspired by research on Google or Wikipedia. I have been known to do some inquiry myself on the settings and characters I read—just to see how close to accurate the novels may be. It’s a sickness. I have lost interest in a story if the work doesn’t match the history.

Because I emphasize fabulous inquiry skill (research) for a novel, I am a bit slow in my writing of stories. The dialog does not bother me to write, plot and twists work out fine, usually. But I get lost in the weeds when I start to research. 

Not because I do not know how to research thoroughly. Precisely the opposite. I not only find information to use for my current work. I often see many different possibilities for new stories and characters—I just cannot keep up. There are so many amazing stories to be told. 

Staying inquisitive and using that creative part of ourselves allows us to be better writers---especially when done well!

How about you, do you access your inquisitive mind when you are writing journey?